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2023 AAENP National Conference: EmergNP Speakers

March 31 - April 2, 2023 | Hempstead, NY

Session Details will be added as we receive them. Please continue to check back.
Keynote Speaker
Moral Injury: Reframing Distress and Creating Change

Wendy Dean, MD is a writer, speaker, podcast host, and the President and co-founder of The Moral Injury of Healthcare

Wendy Dean photoWendy Dean, MD is a writer, speaker, podcast host, and the President and co-founder of The Moral Injury of Healthcare (fixmoralinjury.org), a nonprofit focused on alleviating distress in the workforce through training and consultation. She and her co-founder, Simon G. Talbot, MD, began the conversation about moral injury in healthcare with the publication of their seminal work in STATNews on July 26, 2018. Prior to founding the nonprofit, Dr. Dean had been a practicing physician, worked for the Department of Defense, and as an executive for a large international non-profit supporting military medical research. Dr. Dean graduated from Smith College and the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She did her residency training at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in Hanover, NH.

Abstract

The long-standing narrative of clinician distress focuses on a mismatch between resources and demands. Absent in that framing are the relational ruptures of moral injury experienced by too many clinicians. Addressing both the transactional and relational drivers of distress will be most effective when all healthcare stakeholders join together to coproduce solutions.

Learning Objectives

As a result of participating in this activity, the learner will be able to:

  • Discuss secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout among healthcare clinicians who provide care to trauma patients.
  • Define moral injury.
  • Distinguish between moral injury and burnout.
  • Recognize situations posing a risk of moral injury.
  • Identify steps toward addressing moral injury.
  • Identify resources for support.

Track Speakers
From the ED to the ICU: Exploring the Psychosocial Effects of Providing Nursing Care to Patients from a School Shooting

Travis McCall, PhD, APRN, AGACNP-BC, FNP-BC, CEN, CCEMT-P - Assistant Professor/Flight Nurse Practitioner, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

Dr. Travis McCall is board certified as an Adult-Gerontologic Acute Care and Family Nurse Practitioner. He obtained his Master of Science in Nursing from Vanderbilt University with a specialty education in Emergency Care. He earned his Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Tennessee College of Nursing and completed a graduate minor in Epidemiology in the Department of Public Health. His research focuses on secondary traumatic stress and the promotion of nurse welfare. He currently serves as an Assistant Professor in the Emergency Nurse Practitioner program at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing and practices as a Flight Nurse Practitioner with Vanderbilt LifeFlight.

Abstract

Nurses who care for patients with traumatic injuries are at risk of developing secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Research has identified the events that are most distressing for nurses involve sudden death, children, and adolescents. Therefore, caring for patients who are injured in a multi-casualty, school-associated shooting event would likely be particularly stressful for the involved healthcare clinicians. This research was performed to learn how nurses in an emergency department and inpatient trauma unit described their experiences with providing care to patients who were injured in a school shooting. Interviews with nurses from the emergency department led to the identification of themes and associated findings of 1) preparation and preparedness, 2) coping and support mechanisms and 3) reflections and closure. Among nurses from the trauma unit, qualitative data collection and analysis revealed themes of 1) innocence of the patients, 2) trajectories of increased emotions, and 3) processing emotional stressors. Supportive mechanisms, such as self-care routines, debriefing, and peer support activities, can combat secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout among healthcare clinicians who provide care to trauma patients.
  • Present themes and findings from qualitative data collection and analysis among nurses in an emergency department and trauma unit who cared for patients who were injured in a multi-casualty, school-associated shooting event.
  • Introduce mechanisms for alleviating secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout among professionals who provide care to critically ill or injured patients.

Single Dose Killers: Pediatric Toxicology

Michael Gooch, DNP, APRN, CCP, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-C - Assistant Professor of Nursing & Emergency-Flight NP, Vanderbilt University & Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Michael D. Gooch is board certified as an acute care, family, and emergency nurse practitioner. He has over 25 years of emergency and transport medicine experience. He is an Assistant Professor of Nursing with Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, as well as faculty with the Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, he practices as an emergency and flight nurse practitioner. He has completed over 1,600 patient transports during his tenure with Vanderbilt LifeFlight. He is also employed by TeamHealth and practices in a community emergency department.

Michael is a founding member of the American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners and serves as the Southeastern Regional Director. He also serves as an APRN liaison to the board of directors for the Air and Surface Transport Nurses Association. Michael serves as a column editor for the Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal.

Abstract

Toxicological emergencies are commonly encountered in emergency care. Some are more serious than others. In pediatric patients, there are a few substance known as the single dose killers as it only takes a small amount to cause toxicity. This presentation will review these agents, discuss their clinical manifestations, and management priorities to allow emergency NPs to manage these patients more competently.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify some of the single dose killers in pediatric toxicology.
  • Modify management plans to correct toxicities encountered in pediatric toxicology.
  • Introduce mechanisms for alleviating secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout among professionals who provide care to critically ill or injured patients.

What Exactly Is An EMS Nurse Practitioner And What Do They Do? EMS Nurse PraWhat Exactly Is An EMS Nurse Practitioner And What Do They Do? EMS Nurse Practitioner Panel Discussion

Jacob Miller, DNP, MBS, ACNP, ENP-C, CNS, NRP - Clinical Educator, UC Health Air Care & Mobile Care

Jacob Miller is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Nurse Practitioner, and Paramedic with a background in EMS and critical care transport. He completed his Acute Care NP and CNS education at the University of Maryland, advanced flight nursing education at Case Western Reserve University, and received his DNP from the University of Cincinnati.

He currently sits on the Board of Directors for the Air & Surface Transport Nurses Association, chairs the Emergency Nurses Association’s advanced practice advisory council, and co-chairs the EMS Special Interest Group at the American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners.

After practicing as a flight NP for over 7 years, he has recently accepted a role as the clinical educator at UC Air Care & Mobile Care in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Warren Shaulis, MSN, APRN, FNP-BC, AGACNP-BC, ENP-C, NR-Paramedic

Speaker Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

This rapid-fire presentation will explore the preparation of an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Nurse Practitioner (NP) as well as examining the functions that EMS NP may perform within a given EMS agency or system. Emergency Medical Services is often a poorly understood, over-utilized and under-funded healthcare function in the United States. A growing number of healthcare and EMS organizations have begun to utilize advanced practice providers in varying roles to supplement and enhance the care being provided in diverse out of hospital settings. Recently, professional organizations representing various healthcare professions (including the AAENP) have published position statements designed to influence the preparation, function and deployment of nurse practitioners and other advanced practice providers in the EMS realm.

The EMS NP can and has been utilized to provide administrative support to EMS agencies, as well as providing direct patient care during 911 and interfacility EMS response, utilizing a variety of transport modalities including ground and air ambulances. Mobile Integrated Healthcare (MIH) is a more recently recognized, multidisciplinary function that looks to improve access, equity and inclusiveness of care to high-risk populations, while looking to reduce Emergency Department visits and returns to the ED. The EMS NP is well situated to provide care and support in each of these areas. The speakers are all currently working as NPs in the out of hospital setting and will be discussing their experiences and what the future may hold for this exciting new area of practice.

Learning Objectives

  • Evaluate the current utilization of Nurse Practitioners in the EMS setting.
  • Examine barriers to NPs and other advanced practice providers within the out of hospital and interfacility care and transport realm.
  • Investigate the potential for implementation of a EMS NP role within local/regional EMS services/agencies.

The Well-Appearing Febrile Infant (8 to 60 days): A review of the 2021 AAP Guidelines

Haley Hays, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, ENP-C, AGACNP-BC - Doctor of Nursing/Nurse Practitioner, Aligned Providers of Wyoming

Haley Hays DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, ENP-C, AGACNP-BC, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Family Nurse Practitioner program at the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing and Partner for Aligned Providers of Wyoming. She is also adjunct faculty at Creighton University and faculty appointment at the University of Wyoming Faye Whitney School of Nursing. Dr. Hays obtained her Doctor of Nursing and Family Nurse Practitioner from the University of Wyoming in 2017, a post-graduate Emergency Nurse Practitioner certificate from University of Texas Health Science Center in 2019, and post-graduate Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner certificate through University of Nebraska Medical Center in 2020.

Dr. Hays has worked in health care for over 14 years, with over 10 years-experience in emergency nursing, primarily focused in rural and critical access facilities. Currently, Dr. hays works as an emergency nurse practitioner and acute care nurse practitioner in Kimball, Nebraska and emergency nurse practitioner in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Dr. Hays currently serves as the Bylaws Chair for the American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners. Additionally, she is the secretary of the Wyoming Council of Advanced Practice Nurses and Bylaws chair for Nebraska Nurse Practitioner organization.

Abstract

Well-appearing infants (8 to 60 days old) presenting to the Emergency Department often creates a conundrum when searching for the “sick” needle in the “well” haystack. Over the last several decades, prediction models (e.g. Rochester, Mayo, PECARN) attempted to differeniate between low verses high-risk infants; however with new evidence the emphasis now relies on identifying invasive bacterial illness (ILI). It has become evident after a certain time threshold, not all infants are likely to benefit from lumbar puncture or blood cultures. Many of these risk stratification tools developed to help guide clinical practice lack the ability to reflect the present-day changes in bacteriology, advancement of diagnostic testing and emerging technologies. The purpose of this presentation is to critically evaluate the 2021 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Guidelines for the Evaluation and Management of Febrile Infants for an evidence-based approach and implementation into clinical practice. This presentation will review key action statements by the AAP, exclusions to the 2021 guidelines, and standards of care for the evaluation and management of febrile infants in the following age groups: 8 to 21-days, 22 to 28-days, and 29 to 60-days of age.

Learning Objectives

  • Critically review the AAP 2021 Guidelines for Evaluation and Management of Febrile Infants for implementation into clinical practice to improve the quality and safety of patient care.
  • Differentiate evaluation and management strategies among the three recognized age groups of febrile infants between 8 and 60-days of age.
  • Interpret meaningful diagnostic studies to prevent overtreatment particularly in infants >21-days.

Operationalizing the EMS Nurse Practitioner Role on Maryland’s Eastern Shore

Aaron Sebach, PhD, DNP, MBA, AGACNP-BC, FNP-BC, NP-C, CP-C, CEN, CPEN, CLNC, CGNC, CNE, CNEcl, SFHM - TidalHealth Peninsula Regional, EMS/MIH Nurse Practitioner

Dr. Aaron Sebach is an Emergency Medical Services and Mobile Integrated Health Nurse Practitioner with the Salisbury-Wicomico Integrated FirstCare Team (SWIFT), a collaborative program with TidalHealth Peninsula Regional and the Salisbury Fire Department on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. In tandem with a paramedic, Dr. Sebach treats patients that engage 911 on scene to prevent inappropriate emergency department visits. He also serves as Dean of the College of Health Professions and Natural Sciences at Wilmington University. Blending his clinical and academic roles, Dr. Sebach leads a unique clinical rotation for family nurse practitioner students to experience expanded roles for nurse practitioners in Mobile Integrated Health and Emergency Medical Services.

Tammy Walbert, DNP, FNP-BC, CP-C

Speaker Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

This presentation will highlight the development, implementation, and evaluation of a nurse practitioner (NP)-led Minor Definitive Care Now (MDCN) program. MDCN is an optional protocol for Maryland Emergency Medical Services (EMS) jurisdictions to reduce inappropriate emergency department (ED) utilization. EMS NPs and paramedics respond to and handle low-acuity 911 calls in a dedicated unit, freeing ambulances for high-acuity medical emergencies. Treatment plans include point-of-care laboratory testing, medication administration, medication starter packs, wound care, suturing, and splinting, among others. Program evaluation metrics include the number of patients treated, healthcare savings from avoided ED visits, referrals to community resources, e-prescribing, and the number of patients seen in the ED 48 hours post-treatment.

Learning Objectives

  • Examine Operational Considerations of the EMS Nurse Practitioner Role in a Rural Community
  • Analyze EMS Nurse Practitioner Evaluation Metrics in a Rural Community

Baby Trauma Drama: Initial Evaluation of Minor Head Trauma in Infants & Young Children

Ashton Glover, DNP, FNP-C, ENP-C, SANE-A - Assistant Professor of Nursing, University of North Alabama

Dr. Ashton Glover received her Bachelors of Science in Nursing from the University of North Alabama in Florence, Alabama. She then went on to receive her Masters of Science in Nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama. Ashton is board-certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners as a family and emergency nurse practitioner. She is also a certified sexual assault nurse examiner. Ashton currently practices at several rural emergency departments in the Southeastern United States. She also serves as Assistant Professor at the University of North Alabama where is she teaches in the graduate department. Ashton is a member of the International Association of Forensic Nurses and American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners where she serves on the education committee. Ashton’s scholarly interests include issues related to social determinants of health. emergency care, and forensic nursing. Ashton enjoys spending quality time on her family farm with her husband, two children (Bo Taylor and John Maddax ), and their animals.

Amanda Hitt, MSN, FNP-BC - Lecturer, Nursing; Director of NAMC Scholars & Hilda B. Anderson Scholarships, University of North Alabama

Mrs. Amanda Hitt is a board-certified Family Nurse Practitioner. She received her BSN from UNA in 2004 and later her MSN from UAB in 2012. She is currently in the DNP program at UAB. Her career has kept her in the emergency department both as a nurse and as a nurse practitioner. Mrs. Hitt is a published author and a peer reviewer. She recently commenced serving as an expert witness in her field. Additionally, Mrs. Hitt began teaching undergraduate nursing at the University of North Alabama in 2020 where she shares her passion for both emergency care and pediatrics.

Abstract

The purpose of this presentation is to review current, evidence-based guidelines regarding the initial evaluation and management of infants and young children presenting to the emergency department with minor head trauma. Minor head trauma is one of the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department (ED) visits among infants and small children (Mastrangelo & Midulla, 2017). The majority of these injuries are mild in the absence of neurological abnormalities and can therefore be appropriately managed by close observation (Shiomi et al., 2016). The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) (2017) does not recommend routine neuroimaging for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in children; however, when treating infants and young children, clinical assessment is more difficult, and infants may present asymptomatically despite the presence of an intracranial injury (Shutzman, 2022). While most cases are not linked to significant brain injury or long-term complications; a small minority of infants with seemingly minor head trauma may have a clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI), necessitating extended observation or acute intervention (Shutzman, 2022). Furthermore, infants can sustain skull fractures and ciTBIs in the setting of minor trauma (Kemp et al., 2016; Shutzman, 2022). Neuroimaging with computed tomography (CT) is fast, painless, and the gold standard for detecting intracranial abnormalities; however, it exposes patients to radiation and increases healthcare costs (Neil et al., 2022). The application of a clinical decision rule such as the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PERCARN) algorithm in conjunction with clinician judgment and parental consultation can assist clinicians in identifying infants at higher risk for TBI while minimizing overuse of CT (California ACEP, n.d.; Shutzman, 2022).

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss common findings associated with minor head trauma in infants and young children.
  • Describe the initial evaluation of infants and young children presenting to the emergency department with minor head trauma.
  • Apply the PECARN algorithm to a case of minor, infant head trauma.

Why so BRASH, bro? Identification and management of BRASH syndrome in the ER

Jacob Miller, DNP, MBA, ACNP, ENP-C, CNS, NRP - Clinical Educator, UC Health Air Care & Mobile Care

Jacob Miller is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Nurse Practitioner, and Paramedic with a background in EMS and critical care transport. He completed his Acute Care NP and CNS education at the University of Maryland, advanced flight nursing education at Case Western Reserve University, and received his DNP from the University of Cincinnati.

He currently sits on the Board of Directors for the Air & Surface Transport Nurses Association, chairs the Emergency Nurses Association’s advanced practice advisory council, and co-chairs the EMS Special Interest Group at the American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners.

After practicing as a flight NP for over 7 years, he has recently accepted a role as the clinical educator at UC Air Care & Mobile Care in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Abstract

This presentation will present a patient scenario with a constellation of bradycardia, renal failure, AV nodal blockade, shock, and hyperkalemia (BRASH Syndrome) and highlight considerations in identifying and managing these patients in the emergency setting. Pharmacotherapeutic content will involve the role of pharmacologic agents as a contributing mechanism (i.e., AV nodal blocking agents) in addition to the pharmacotherapeutic management of BRASH Syndrome.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the pathophysiology of BRASH Syndrome and articulate the synergy between each of its components
  • Formulate a treatment plan to rapidly intervene to prevent morbidity and mortality in a patient with BRASH Syndrome

The Heart of Emergency Practice; The 2021 updated Guidelines for the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Chest Pain

Adam Dobbins, APRN, FNP-C, ENP-C, PhD - Emergency Nurse Practitioner, Clarinda Regional Medical Center

Adam began his career with an agriculture degree and master’s in Physiology, entering animal health in the dairy industry and transitioning to teaching agriculture and health sciences in Western New York. After moving to the Kansas City area, he entered nursing. His experience has been strongly focused on emergency care with experience at a large academic level one trauma center and small critical access rural care. He has been involved with AAENP education and currently serves on the EmergNP conference planning team. His current practice is in rural Iowa, providing single provider coverage in the emergency department and serving on faculty at the University of Central Missouri.

2001 BSA Agriculture Education – West Virginia University
2003 MS Physiology – West Virginia University
2010 BSN – William Jewell College
2013 MSN – University of Kansas Medical Center
2019 PhD – University of Kansas Medical Center

Nursing Experience:
2010-2011 RN, med/tele, University Health, Kansas City, MO
2011-2013 RN, Emergency Department, University Health, Kansas City, MO
2013-2020 APRN, Emergency Department, University Health, Kansas City, MO
2019-current APRN, Docs Who Care, locums ED rural coverage
2020-current APRN, Clarinda Regional Health Center, Clarinda, IA
2021-current Adjunct Faculty, University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO

Abstract

The Amercian Heart Association and American College of Cardiology among other published the 2021 Guideline for the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Chest Pain in November 2021 in the Journal of Circulation. This presentation will review the guideline updates that are pertinent to Emergency and Observation Medicine. Updates include timing on interpretation of high sensitivity troponins, guidelines on the admission of patients to observation for "chest pain rule-out", and follow up stress testing. It is important to disseminate this information so that the Emergency Medicine community can be following the most up to date guidelines.

Learning Objectives

  • Review definitions for chest pain and chest pain equilivants, preferred high-sensitivity troponins, and early care/EMS activation for chest pain.
  • Review clinical decision pathways for chest pain in the emergency department and when observation care is warranted.
  • Review updates on guidelines regarding patient discharge, and recommendations for ED follow-up timing and testing.

Disposition Decisions...How do I choose the best for my patient!

Tiffany Andrews, MS, ACNP-BC, ENP-C, CCNS-BC - USACS National Director of APP Education, American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners

Passionate about educating and onboarding NPs and PAs in all aspects of emergency medicine, inpatient, critical care and more. I am a firm believer that we need to develop our APPs to the best of our ability to prepare our APPs for success both clinically and develop our future leaders in all service lines.

As an Acute Care/Emergency Medicine Nurse Practitioner in A busy level 2 Trauma/Emergency Department, I provide care to the sick, severely injured and critically ill patient. We coordinate care with our physician and nursing colleagues in order to help diagnose, treat acute illness &injury as well as reduce complications and facilitate rehabilitation. The ER team depends upon advanced practice providers to maintain continuity of care, facilitate progression of the patient, as well as respond to crises big and small.

As an Acute Care/Emergency Nurse Practitioner we “make it happen”, whether the situation calls for resuscitation, diagnoses, treatment, daily patient management, collaboration with our physician colleagues or discharge coordination.

Specialties: Education Development, Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Surgical Care, Observation Medicine, Hospitalist Medicine, Neurotrauma, Neurosurgery, Cardiac Surgery, Lung Transplantation, Heart Transplantation, IMC, Ambulatory Care, ICU, ACLS, BLS, ATLS, FCCS, Clinical Simulation, Clinical Education, Advance Practice Provider Education.

Abstract

Being able to think patients through to their final disposition can be a challenging skill at the clerkship level. However, a good clinician should start thinking about a patient’s disposition as soon as they pick up the chart. Once you’ve made a decision regarding whether the patient is able to go home or should be admitted to hospital, there are still more factors to consider! This talk will focus on some things to consider when deciding disposition of your patient from the ED...whether that is home, observation, admission or even ICU!

Learning Objectives

  • Determine the effect of high ED occupancy on disposition decisions, return ED visits, and hospitalizations.
  • Identify types of disposition decisions that can be made for your patient and what is the most appropriate for your patient.
  • Understand the importance of a discharge time out prior to disposition home

Updated Opioid Guidelines

Session Details Coming Soon.


OH! So Glad It's YOU on Shift Today!

LaMon Norton, NP

Session Details Coming Soon.

Abstract

The emergency medicine workplace is fraught with stress. Shortages of people, things, and space to care for all the patients we are seeing in the midst of the post pandemic and great resignation intersection is overwhelming on many days, and almost insurmountable on other days. We are facing a difficult new normal right now, and having a culture of caring internally is as important as the external care we give to patients. This quick primer on how to nurture your crew and get yourself recharged at the same time is not rocket science, but may be just what you need to try. Be the one when they see you walk in that hears "Oh, I'm so glad it's you today".

Learning Objectives

  • Describe behaviors conducive to increased staff confidence and comfort
  • Develop personal action plan

I've Got 99 Problems, but the Gallbladder Isn't One

Nneka Nweke, MHA, MPAS, PA-C - Physician Assistant, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Wendy Dean, MD is a writer, speaker, podcast host, and the President and co-founder of The Moral Injury of Healthcare (fixmoralinjury.org), a nonprofit focused on alleviating distress in the workforce through training and consulation. She and her co-founder, Simon G. Talbot, MD, began the conversation about moral injury in healthcare with the publication of their seminal work in STATNews on July 26, 2018.

Prior to founding the nonprofit, Dr. Dean had been a practicing physician, worked for the Department of Defense, and as an executive for a large international non-profit supporting military medical research.

Dr. Dean graduated from Smith College and the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She did her residency training at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in Hanover, NH.

Abstract

Many times we are faced with abdominal pain as a leading complaint in the ED. From there we hone in the location of the pain, most commonly on the right side. The gallbladder has a huge spectrum from simple inflammation to duct enlarging leading to septic shock. This rapid course will provide quick facts and information on the core content of cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, choledocholithiasis and cholangitis.

Learning Objectives

  • Learners will be able to differentiate between major gallbladder diseases (cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, choledocholithiasis and cholangitis).
  • Apply evidence based tactics to distinguish key history, physical and diagnostic elements for the gallbladder diseases.

Beware of Badness: OB Emergencies

LaMon Norton, NP

Speaker Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

There is currently national attention on perinatal mortality, and good evidence that outside the specialty OB practice, clinical indicators can be missed that have deleterious impact to our perinatal patients, and by extension to our society. Vital signs, proximity of certain clinical complaints to a recent pregnancy, and bias are all features that will be reviewed. Several case based studies are included.

Learning Objectives

  • Define the span of perinatal emergency period
  • Identify early clinical cues of pregnancy or postpartum emergencies
  • Recognize common dismissed patient presentations that are high risk

EM Pharmacology Review

Michael Gooch, DNP, APRN, CCP, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-C - Assistant Professor of Nursing & Emergency-Flight NP, Vanderbilt University & Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Michael D. Gooch is board certified as an acute care, family, and emergency nurse practitioner. He has over 25 years of emergency and transport medicine experience. He is an Assistant Professor of Nursing with Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, as well as faculty with the Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, he practices as an emergency and flight nurse practitioner. He has completed over 1,600 patient transports during his tenure with Vanderbilt LifeFlight. He is also employed by TeamHealth and practices in a community emergency department.

Michael is a founding member of the American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners and serves as the Southeastern Regional Director. He also serves as an APRN liaison to the board of directors for the Air and Surface Transport Nurses Association. Michael serves as a column editor for the Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal.

Abstract

This presentation will provide a review of common or newer medications used in emergency medicine. Using clinical case studies and vignettes, and a body system approach, common cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and central nervous system medications will be reviewed. This review will discuss the mechanisms of action, side effects, interactions, considerations, monitoring, and/or related guidelines and supporting evidence. At this end of this review, the emergency nurse practitioner will have a renewed knowledge of commonly used emergency medicine medications.

Learning Objectives

  • Recall indications for select medications commonly used in emergency care settings.
  • Develop plans of care while considering pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications commonly used in emergency care settings.
  • Modify plans of care to meet established guidelines for management of acute and chronic illnesses encountered in emergency care settings.
  • Develop patient education regarding medications commonly used in emergency care settings.

Positioning the Emergency Nurse Practitioner for National Recognition & Growth

Jen Wilbeck, DNP, APRN, FAANP, FAAN - Professor and Academic Director, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

Dr. Jennifer Wilbeck is a Professor of Nursing at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing and the Emergency NP Academic Director. Over the past two decades, her efforts have promoted the ENP role nationally and internationally through education, service, practice and advocacy. She has been involved in teh development of national practice standards, the creation of a national ENP specialty certification board examination, and most recently updated ENP Competencies.

Her scholarly interests include the role of simulation in nurse practitioner education, ENP practice issues and competency assessment. Dr. Wilbeck currently serves as the AAENP Executive Director of AAENP and on the Editorial Board for the Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal.

Wesley Davis, DNP, ENP-C, FNP-C, AGACNP-BC, CEN, FAANP, FAEN - President, American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners /p>

Dr. Wesley Davis is triple board-certified as an Emergency Nurse Practitioner, a Family Nurse Practitioner, and an Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Dr. Davis completed his Doctor of Nursing Practice degree in 2014 at the University of South Alabama.

Currently, he serves as the associate editor for the Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal. Dr. Davis is a Fellow of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and the Academy of Emergency Nursing. Dr. Davis currently serves as the President of AAENP and is an Assistant Professor at the University of South Alabama where he developed the ENP and dual FNP/ENP programs.

Abstract

As the emergency care workforce evolves and nursing educational standards are changing, the nurse practitioners working in emergency care have unique opportunities. To maximize recognition and bolster recognition within the emergency care landscape, it is essential that practicing NPs as well as leaders in emergency care consider how to best position the role of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner for increased national recognition & sustained professional viability. This session will explore the current state of the ENP specialty, focusing on the licensure, accreditation, certification, and education model for APRN regulation, as well as the potential outcomes if the ENP specialty was transitioned to a population within the Consensus Model of Regulation. The strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats of differing placements of the ENP within the context of current nursing regulation.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify at least two challenges to NP practice in emergency care within the current model of ENP practice as a specialty.
  • Identify at least two opportunities or strengths of transitioning ENP practice to a population within the Consensus model.
  • Identify at least two weakness or threats of transitioning ENP practice to a population within the Consensus model.

Implementing Ongoing Professional Development for Emergency Providers

Session Details Coming Soon.


Save Your Money! Maximize the MDM

LaMon Norton, NP

Speaker Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

Help your revenue survive the new rules on reimbursement. A primer on best practices using MDM thinking, phrases: and the communicating of those key elements to coders via the chart. A review of the impact to emergency medicine billing and practice since inception of the new billing method in Jan 2023, and where things might be headed.

Learning Objectives

  • List 10 key points to capture or highlight in chart
  • Demonstrate efficient phrasing for optimal coding
  • Recognize common overlooked social determinant health issues

Approaches to Leadership: What works best for you

Kevin Walsh, PA-C

Speaker Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

The goal of this talk is to discuss how opportunities to lead are not always obvious. Sometimes leadership opportunities require making a leap or getting out of your comfort zone. Leadership comes in many forms. It isn’t always a grand title that makes you a leader. Leadership starts with a desire to help others recognize their greatness and inspire them to be the best they can be.

Learning Objectives

  • Differentiate the various types of leadership and what works best for you
  • Identify how to be a more effective leader for your team, even if its a new role
  • Evaluate leadership opportunities in the obvious and sometimes obscure places
  • Apply your clinical leadership tools beyond the day to day department operations to inspire, prevent burnout and engage your team to make a difference.

When You're The Hostage Negotiator AND The Hostage: Applying FBI Techniques To Your Patient Encounters - ask to shorten to 30 min/role play during break?

Michael Sharma, PA-C

Speaker Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

Have you ever had a hard time talking with a patient? Sometimes even encounters about minor upper respiratory infections can turn into major headaches. Critical discussions about things like admissions and palliative care present their own hurdles as well. During this talk, we'll go over lessons from modern negotiating theory and practice, with a focus on tactics taught by the FBI's former lead international kidnapping negotiator. The speaker, an experienced EM clinician, will demonstrate how these lessons can be easily brought into the exam room for your next encounter. Participants will also role-play as clinicians to practice these skills.

Learning Objectives

  • Contrast how speaking with fellow clinicians is different than speaking in laypeople in distress, and how different competencies are required for success.
  • Develop "mirroring" and "labeling" skills so they can be applied as the patient tells their story, facilitating the rapid development of rapport. 3)Distinguish between merely open-ended questions and "calibrated" questions, and how calibrated questions can speed a patient encounter towards a satisfying conclusion.

Bedside to Boardroom

Donna Moravick, NP

Speaker Bio Coming Soon.

Abstract

Abstract Coming Soon.


Hospital at Home: A Change in the Course of Care

Garrett Gaillard, DNP, FNP-C, ENP-C - Cleveland Clinic

Garrett Gaillard DNP, FNP-C, ENP-C completed his undergraduate work and doctoral degree in nursing at Florida State University. He attended post-graduate training in emergency medicine at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. For the last eight years Garrett has worked in emergency and observational medicine, both in a traditional hospital setting, as well as “Hospital at Home” programs. His previous research centers on emergency department dispositions predictive measures analyzing bounce backs to the emergency department. Garrett currently works for the Hospital at Home program at the The Cleveland Clinic in Weston, FL .

Abstract

Acute care services in the United States are largely delivered in the hospital setting. Since the recent pandemic, acute care services in the hospital have become overwhelmed. An elderly population with co-morbidities and lack of hospital capacity is leading to a ‘hospital without walls’ approach to acute care. Hospital at Home (HaH) is a paradigm shift in the standard way to administer acute care.

Learning Objectives

  • Critically analyze patient presentations that may be suitable for admission to hospital at home programs.
  • Change the way we think about patient disposition and how hospital at home may benefit the over all care of the patient 3) Analyze and understand the resources needed for delivering care to the hospital at home patient.

Opioid CDC Guideline Updates

Session Details Coming Soon.


COVID-19 Remote Patient Monitoring Program

Marisa Arky, DNP, CRNP - Associate Clinical Director Telehealth, MedStar

Marisa Arky, DNP, FNP-C, AGACNP-BC is a dual certified Family and Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner with experience in Emergency Medicine, Telemedicine, Urgent Care, and Observation settings. She received her Doctor of Nursing Practice and Master of Science in Nursing Degrees from the University of South Alabama. She served as Clinical Lead for MedStar Health’s COVID19 Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) Program, and recently embarked on a new role as Associate Clinical Director of Telehealth for MedStar Telehealth Innovation Center (MTIC). She is interested in healthcare innovation and strategic interdisciplinary collaborations and is committed to expanding care access and decreasing healthcare disparities.

Abstract

Remote patient monitoring (RPM) has evolved into a powerful tool for expanding care delivery. Here, we discuss lessons learned from implementing a large-scale COVID-19 RPM program. RPM filled an important care gap during COVID-19. With limited inpatient capacity and a need for population distancing to minimize infectious spread, it was critical to redistribute care from the ED and hospital setting to the community, while maintaining a high standard of quality. RPM was identified as a care option for select COVID-19 patients who were discharged from the Emergency Departments (EDs), monoclonal antibody infusion (mAb) sites, and certain inpatient settings to support their treatment and recovery outside a traditional health facility. For some, RPM served as a primary point of access to the health care system. It allowed for early detection of disease progression and provided additional reassurance to patients safely recovering at home. In the first two years of the pandemic, more than 10,600 patients enrolled in the program - the largest to-date to capture both physiologic and symptomatologic data. Most patients actively participating were able to safely recover in their homes. However, RPM remains vulnerable to the same disparities that affect healthcare as a whole: differences in health literacy, technologic literacy, and availability of services. Two populations that often experience limited access to RPM were included: participants without smartphones, and participants whose primary language is not English. These are the exact vulnerable populations for whom RPM may prove particularly valuable as a safety net. Of these, 120 did not own smartphones and 43 spoke a primary language other than English (including Spanish, Portuguese, and Thai). As of spring 2022, the number of COVID-19 community cases had down trended and demand for the COVID-19 RPM program had similarly declined, and it was decided to sunset the offering. However, the program is flexible and can be rapidly resumed if patient demand increases—especially with a connected care supporting workforce model in place. As the utilization of RPM and other telehealth modalities continues to grow, we should be cognizant of promoting equity. Inclusion criteria, platform selection, communication modality, and methods of data collection all significantly impact patient experience. If deployed conscientiously, RPM can be a powerful tool in the telehealth landscape to fill in existing holes in health care accessibility.

Learning Objectives

  • To evaluate feasibility of implementing a large-scale COVID19 RPM program
  • To observe trends in enrollment, activation, and participation, assess patient feedback, and identify lessons learned
  • To identify disparities in telehealth access and to make RPM more accessible
  • To recognize systematic areas for improvement for application towards other RPM and telehealth modalities

Are you Prepped for PrEP?

Michael Gooch, DNP, APRN, CCP, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-C - Assistant Professor of Nursing & Emergency-Flight NP, Vanderbilt University & Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Dr. Michael D. Gooch is board certified as an acute care, family, and emergency nurse practitioner. He has over 25 years of emergency and transport medicine experience. He is an Assistant Professor of Nursing with Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, as well as faculty with the Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia. At Vanderbilt University Medical Center, he practices as an emergency and flight nurse practitioner. He has completed over 1,600 patient transports during his tenure with Vanderbilt LifeFlight. He is also employed by TeamHealth and practices in a community emergency department.

Michael is a founding member of the American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners and serves as the Southeastern Regional Director. He also serves as an APRN liaison to the board of directors for the Air and Surface Transport Nurses Association. Michael serves as a column editor for the Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal.

Abstract

Toxicological emergencies are commonly encountered in emergency care. Some are more serious than others. In pediatric patients, there are a few substance known as the single dose killers as it only takes a small amount to cause toxicity. This presentation will review these agents, discuss their clinical manifestations, and management priorities to allow emergency NPs to manage these patients more competently.

Abstract

Are you prepped for PrEP, wait, what is PrEP? What is its role in emergency care and who needs access? These are some of the areas that will be discussed as we discuss PrEP or pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV. Not every emergency care NP will be in the position to initiate PrEP, but we all encounter patients at risk who would benefit from PrEP, and likely care for those who are already receiving this therapy. This presentation will provide NPs the needed knowledge to recognize the utility of PrEP, and either refer or initiate therapy in patients at risk for HIV infection.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the role of PrEP in emergency care settings.
  • Identify populations eligible for PrEP.
  • Discuss PreP referral, initiation and monitoring.

Procedural Speakers

Alternatives to Opioids: Regional Anesthesia for Dental Pain Relief

Erica May, DNP, ARNP, AG-ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-C - Instructor of Nursing, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing

Erica May, DNP, APRN, is board certified as a Family, Adult Gerontology Acute Care, and Emergency Nurse Practitioner. She is an Instructor of Nursing at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, where she teaches in the Emergency Nurse Practitioner program. Dr. May currently practices in the Emergency Department at StoneCrest Medical Center, in Smyrna, TN. Having seen the devastating effects of the opioid crisis, Dr. May is keenly interested in alternatives to opioid pain management in the emergency department. A love of the outdoors also drives an interest in wilderness and austere medicine, and Dr. May is an active member of the Wilderness Medical Society, as well as volunteering with the Tennessee Scenic Rivers Association to teach safety and rescue skills to recreational boaters. When she isn’t teaching or working in the ED, Dr. May enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband and two dogs.

Abstract

Non-traumatic dental pain is a common patient presentation in the Emergency Department. Historically, these patients are treated with antibiotics and pain medications, often opioids. Since the abuse of opioids was designated a public health crisis, clinicians have worked to find ways to effectively treat patient pain without using opioids. This procedural workshop will train providers to address non-traumatic dental pain using three types of regional anesthesia: Supraperiosteal, mental, and inferior alveolar dental blocks, empowering Emergency Nurse Practitioners to address pain without using opioids.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize patients with acute non-traumatic dental pain in the Emergency Department
  • Employ the tenets of Alternative to Opioids to address acute pain
  • Perform supraperiosteal, mental, and inferior alveolar dental nerve blocks.

Evaluation and Management of Rabies Exposures in the Emergency Department

Peter Costa, MPH, MCHES, AVES (Hon) - US Medical Affairs Regional Lead, Bavarian Nordic

Peter Costa is the US Medical Affairs Regional Lead for Bavarian Nordic. Peter has a graduate degree in public health and is a honorary member of the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society.

Peter has been a rabies educator for over 15 years and as a co-founder and past global coordinator of the annual World Rabies Day observance, Peter has helped educate people about rabies in over 150 countries.

Peter's passion is educating on the public health management of humans at risk to rabies and in addition to his work with Bavarian Nordic, Peter sits on the Rabies in the Americas International Steering Committee and supports global rabies control efforts aiming to eliminate human rabies caused by dogs using a One Health approach.

Abstract

This presentation will review key facts about rabies and rabies prevention. We'll then discuss how to determine if someone has been exposed to rabies, what to do, when and how and what the difference is between active and passive immunization. We'll end with some interactive case studies of real patients exposed to rabies virus to identify the appropriate course of clinical action to be taken by the practitioner.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain what rabies is and how it is transmitted
  • Describe how to perform a rabies exposure risk assessment to determine if rabies post-exposure prophylaxis is necessary
  • Describe how to perform a rabies exposure risk assessment to determine if rabies post-exposure prophylaxis is necessary

Mysticism of Embolism: Demystifying Pulmonary Embolism

Samantha Ewing, DNP, FNP-C, ENP-C, CEN, TCRN, CCRN - Emergency Medicine APP Fellow, UT Southwestern

Samantha "Sam" Ewing is a doctorally-prepared dual-certified family and emergency nurse practitioner. She earned her DNP from Emory University in 2021. She has over 7 years of diverse nursing experience and is a 2022-2023 UTSouthwestern emergency medicine APP fellow.

Abstract

This is a 20 minute rapid fire presentation intended to engage learners in a fast-paced review of the epidemiological significance, presentation, diagnosis, and management of pulmonary embolism (PE). We will begin by exploring the importance of maintaining a high clinical suspicion for rapid identification of PE and reviewing clinical decision rules. Case presentations will engage participants, and as we review patient presentations, we will also identify common EKG and POCUS that aide in diagnosis. Finally, we will briefly cover the varying treatment modalities and ED disposition for patients diagnosed with acute PE.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify common EKG findings associated with diagnosis of pulmonary embolism
  • Identify common POCUS findings associated with diagnosis of pulmonary embolism
  • Critically review clinical decision rules and apply them to presented cases

Common procedure complications

Details Coming Soon.


Chest Xr Interpretation

Details Coming Soon.


ECG interpretation…From Basics and Beyond

Tiffany Andrews, MS, ACNP-BC, ENP-C, CCNS-BC - USACS National Director of APP Education, American Academy of Emergency Nurse Practitioners

Passionate about educating and onboarding NPs and PAs in all aspects of emergency medicine, inpatient, critical care and more. I am a firm believer that we need to develop our APPs to the best of our ability to prepare our APPs for success both clinically and develop our future leaders in all service lines.

As an Acute Care/Emergency Medicine Nurse Practitioner in A busy level 2 Trauma/Emergency Department, I provide care to the sick, severely injured and critically ill patient. We coordinate care with our physician and nursing colleagues in order to help diagnose, treat acute illness &injury as well as reduce complications and facilitate rehabilitation. The ER team depends upon advanced practice providers to maintain continuity of care, facilitate progression of the patient, as well as respond to crises big and small.

As an Acute Care/Emergency Nurse Practitioner we “make it happen”, whether the situation calls for resuscitation, diagnoses, treatment, daily patient management, collaboration with our physician colleagues or discharge coordination.

Specialties: Education Development, Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care, Surgical Care, Observation Medicine, Hospitalist Medicine, Neurotrauma, Neurosurgery, Cardiac Surgery, Lung Transplantation, Heart Transplantation, IMC, Ambulatory Care, ICU, ACLS, BLS, ATLS, FCCS, Clinical Simulation, Clinical Education, Advance Practice Provider Education.

Abstract

This course is designed for beginner healthcare professional to begin to understand, analyzing and interpreting basic electrocardiogram (ECG) rhythms. The course includes an overview of the heart's anatomy, physiology and electrophysiology in relation to the ECG rhythm. This course aims to provide healthcare professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct systematic ECG analyses of basic cardiac rhythms, and understand the diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias in order to give the correct and immediate treatment to patients with arrhythmias.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the electrical pathway of the heart
  • Identify the three planes of electrocardiography: standard limb leads, augmented leads, precordial leads
  • Describe the components of a normal 12 Lead ECG
  • Describe a systemic approach to interpretation of 12 Lead ECG.
  • Identify some common EKG findings on the 12 Lead ECG